Welcome Bonus

A welcome bonus is a present that casinos give to new players as a thank you for registering with them. After you make a deposit, most of the time, you will be given extra money to play with. However, there are many different sorts, so what you get and how much is dependent on each offer. This implies you must comprehend what is accessible to ensure you select the finest welcome bonus casino for your needs.

What Is the Definition of a Welcome Bonus?

A welcome bonus is a benefit that a casino gives to new players who sign up. The incentive varies, but it’s usually in the form of extra money or free spins. You will receive a welcome bonus at all of the casinos we recommend. Welcome bonuses might be quite lucrative, as they are the casino’s opportunity to persuade you to play at their site by offering something unusual or special. To activate a welcome bonus, follow these steps:

  1. Visit the casino of your choice.
  2. Sign up as a new customer.
  3. Make a deposit using a deposit method.
  4. Receive a bonus for signing up.

Some casinos want you to manually pick a welcome offer. For example, when making a payment, you may need to choose it from a drop-down menu or use a bonus code. These aspects are completely dependent on each site, but they should be well-advertised so you don’t miss out. If you’re stumped, contact the casino’s support staff and they’ll guide you through it. You should be up and operational in a few minutes.

How Does Casino Welcome Bonus Work?

Keep in mind that the fine print frequently specifies whether or not a good online casino welcome bonus exists.

Casino welcome bonus is very popular in Canadian casinos

How Do I Know What I’ll Get?

The most common welcome bonuses are tiered, meaning that they provide you a set amount of money to play with on top of the money you put down. The first thing to consider is how much extra money you’ll receive. It’s based on three factors: how much you deposit, the casino’s willingness to match your deposit, and the maximum bonus amount.

At first it might sound difficult, but stick with us and you’ll be able to do it in no time. For example, a typical welcome offer is 100% up to $100. The term “100%” implies that the casino will match your payment in full, so if you put down $50, the casino would give you an extra $50 in return. There is, however, a limit.

The $100 portion indicates the maximum amount of extra money the casino is prepared to pay you. If you put $150 in, they would only give you $100 more. Unfortunately, the casinos don’t just let you withdraw that money. Instead, you must wager it.

Wagering Requirements

Wagering requirements are generally part of all casino bonuses. This entails betting repeatedly with your bonus until you reach a specified amount. Wagering is often expressed as a number like “x40”. This implies you’ll frequently need to multiply what you’ve been given for extra money by 40 in order to know how much you should wager. It may once again appear complex, but it’s best explained with an example.

For example, a 100% bonus up to $100 is offered with x40 wagering on the bonus. You deposit $100, and you receive an additional $100 in bonus money. As the wagering is solely on the additional money, you must multiply $100 by 40 to arrive at $4,000. To withdraw your additional money and any profits, you must first use it to wager a total of $4,000. Unfortunately, casinos frequently have a maximum bet limit of $5 per spin/round, so you can’t just rush through it.

Forfeitable Welcome Bonus

What do you choose first: the additional money or your own deposit? It may sound strange, but you could want to test it out on your own money first. If you do and the incentive is no longer available, here’s how it works:

  • Try it with your own money first
  • If you win: take home the money by giving up the bonus
  • If you lose: make good use of the money as a second chance to win it back.

A forfeitable bonus is essentially a second chance. You may not wish to use your own money if you are trying out a new game for the first time, for example. You’re just interested in seeing if it’s any good before placing any real money bets. You might opt for a non-forfeitable offer instead in this instance.